Can quasicrystals survive in planetary collisions?

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Marco E. Ciriotti
Messaggi: 28029
Iscritto il: ven 25 giu, 2004 11:31
Località: via San Pietro, 55 I-10073 Devesi/Cirié TO - Italy
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Can quasicrystals survive in planetary collisions?

Messaggio da Marco E. Ciriotti » gio 22 apr, 2021 11:55

Referenza:
▪ Stagno, V., Bindi, L., Takagi, S., Kyono, A. (2021): Can quasicrystals survive in planetary collisions? Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, 8, 27.

Abstract:
We investigated the compressional behavior of i-AlCuFe quasicrystal using diamond anvil cell under quasi-hydrostatic conditions by in situ angle-dispersive X-ray powder diffraction measurements (in both compression and decompression) up to 76 GPa at ambient temperature using neon as pressure medium. These data were compared with those collected up to 104 GPa using KCl as pressure medium available in literature. In general, both sets of data indicate that individual d-spacing shows a continuous decrease with pressure with no drastic changes associated to structural phase transformations or amorphization. The d/d0, where d0 is the d-spacing at ambient pressure, showed a general isotropic compression behavior. The zero-pressure bulk modulus and its pressure derivative were calculated fitting the volume data to both the Murnaghan- and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state models. Results from this study extend our knowledge on the stability of icosahedrite at very high pressure and reinforce the evidence that natural quasicrystals formed during a shock event in asteroidal collisions and survived for eons in the history of the Solar System.
Marco E. Ciriotti

«Things are interesting only in so far as they relate themselves to other things»

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Marco E. Ciriotti
Messaggi: 28029
Iscritto il: ven 25 giu, 2004 11:31
Località: via San Pietro, 55 I-10073 Devesi/Cirié TO - Italy
Contatta:

Re: Can quasicrystals survive in planetary collisions?

Messaggio da Marco E. Ciriotti » gio 22 apr, 2021 12:01

Referenza:
▪ Tommasini, S., Bindi, L., Petrelli, M., Asimov, P.D., Steinhardt, P.J. (2021): Trace Element Conundrum of Natural Quasicrystals. ACS Earth and Space Chemistry, 5, 676–689.

Abstract:
We report laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements of the trace element contents of the two naturally occurring quasicrystalline minerals, Al63Cu24Fe13 icosahedrite and Al71Ni24Fe5 decagonite, from their type locality in the Khatyrka meteorite. The isolated quasicrystal fragments were mounted separately from any matrix and are larger than the laser beam diameter. When the elements are sorted in order of volatility, a systematic and unique pattern emerges in both bulk natural quasicrystal specimens. They are highly depleted compared to primitive solar system materials (chondritic meteorites) in moderately refractory elements (those with 50% condensation temperatures near 1350–1300 K; V, Co, Mg, Cr) and significantly enriched in moderately volatile elements (those with 50% condensation temperatures between 1250 and 500 K; Sb, B, Ag, Sn, Bi). We compare the chondrite-normalized trace element patterns and ratios of the quasicrystals to those of scoriaceous cosmic spherules and other meteoritic components. The nonmonotonic shapes of the chondrite-normalized trace element patterns in both icosahedrite and decagonite are incompatible with a single condensation process from the gas of the solar nebula. Previous transmission electron microscopy studies show that the natural quasicrystals contain 3–5 vol % of silicate and oxide nanoparticle inclusions, which we consider to be the main host of the measured trace elements. On this basis, we construct a three-stage model for the formation of the quasicrystals and their inclusions: a high-temperature condensation stage and a low-temperature vapor-fractionation stage to make nanoparticles, followed by a third stage that leads to the formation of quasicrystals incorporating the two different types of nanoparticles and their incorporation into the CV chondrite parent body of the Khatyrka meteorite.
Marco E. Ciriotti

«Things are interesting only in so far as they relate themselves to other things»

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